Cooking For Two

cooking for twoWith more stores selling by the bulk, it is difficult for small families to cook dishes for only a few members without spoiling the food a day or two later.  What you can do is to purchase items carefully by following these suggestions when it comes to planning healthy meals for just two.

Buy produce in the bag

Buying whole produce when you only need a small portion of it is not an ideal shopping strategy.  You can only do that when purchasing small veggies that you use more often such as garlic and onions. 

Better buy produce such as fruit, vegetables, and even spices that are prepared, mixed, and stored in bags.  These packaged mixes are convenient for smaller homes because you consume the whole bag when preparing healthy dishes from it. 

You can also purchase precut fruit and vegetables so you can buy just the amount you need.

Buy meats exactly how much you want it

If you only want half a pound of beef brisket, go to your local butcher store or seafood store that provides meat, chicken, or seafood at the exact amount. 

Avoid stores that only offer prepackaged meats, especially if you are not going to use the remaining meat for quite some time.  However, if you resort to buying packaged meat, wrap the extras tightly and freeze them.

Buy seafood by the can

A six or seven-ounce can or pouches of tuna, salmon, sardines, and crab are perfect for homes with two members.

Only buy two pounds of fresh seafood

If you need fresh seafood like shrimp or mussels, buy only two pounds of it.  For shrimps, the peeled frozen tail-on variant gives you more meat and less time to prepare. 

Meanwhile, a two-pound bag of fresh mussel yields six ounces of cooked meat, which is appropriate for two people.

Use bouillon cubes instead of broths

When only needing a small amount of it when cooking, broth sold in cans would force you to freeze the unused amount.  If this happens to you, make sure to freeze the broth in ice cubes to make it more convenient because you only put in how much cubes you want in your dish. 

However, it is more convenient and budget saving if you purchase low-sodium bouillon cubes instead.

Buy small when needed

When needing to purchase small but not-so-commonly used vegetables like beets, chickpeas, and tomatoes, buy them in small cans or bags.  Meanwhile, small boxes of vegetable juice are convenient for making sauces and salad dressings. 

When you are in the mood to eat homemade pizza, substitute whole-wheat pita breads instead of a large ball of dough.  This strategy also goes well when buying dairy products such as milk, yogurt, cheese, and ice cream.

Buy bulk when needed

When it comes to grains, nuts, and dried fruits, buy them in bulk.  Dried foods do not spoil easily and can be easily stored in the cupboard, leaving you more refrigerator space. 

Also, butter can be bought by the block, as you do not need to worry too much whether or not it will spoil too soon.  You can safely store butter in your freezer for up to six months.