Can Vinegar Prevent Weight Gain?

A recent study supports an age-old claim that acetic acid in vinegar can help prevent weight gain.

Scientists at the Central Research Institute in Tokyo announced the results of their study in the July 8 issue of the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

The researchers found evidence supporting the ability of acetic acid prevent the buildup of body fat in mice, even when the rodents were fed a high-fat diet.

The research also shows evidence showing that acetic acid triggers genes to produce proteins that break down fat. Still, more research is needed to see if it would yield the same result in humans.

The thing is however, there are several varieties of vinegar, all of which have different acetic acid concentrations. Table vinegar typically has an acetic acid concentration of about 4-8 percent (by volume).

Varieties of acetic acid – at higher concentrations – are used in pesticides, paints, and adhesives. This means you have to be careful in your selections. Ingesting or even inhaling acetic acid concentrations at levels of over 15 percent can cause injuries and irritations to the to the esophagus and nasal linings. Heavy intake of vinegar over a long period of time may also lower potassium levels and cause bone density loss. Too high concentration levels can also cause teeth enamel erosion and gastrointestinal lining perforation.

Armed with this information, hopefully you’d avoid rushing to your grocery store to grab bottles of vinegar just because you read that it could prevent weight gain in mice. Proper diet, portion control and exercise is still the best – and safest – way to get fit.

Source: MSN Health