Take Your Strength Training Outdoors

The warm summer days enable you to do outdoor exercises like biking, walking, hiking, running, swimming, and other outdoor exercises. That’s all very well for cardio vascular health, but you need strength training to build muscle.

Good news, you can move your resistance training outdoors too. And it’s a lot more fun to do it outdoors.

And on top of that, you may also get results faster when you work out outside. Studies indicate that moving your routine outdoors can boost the intensity without making it feel harder.  

Grab your workout buddy and do strength training moves outside. Warm up by doing 5-10 minutes of walking, and then do some stretching afterward. Perform 8-12 reps of each move. Just remember to coordinate clearly with your partner when working out.

Wheelbarrow Push-up

This move works your shoulders, chest, triceps, and, abs and glutes.

You will need your partner to perform this move. The buddy wheelbarrow push-ups work more muscle than the solo variation, making it a more effective strength training move.

To do this, start by putting yourself in a push-up position with your hands directly beneath your shoulders. Keep your back straight. Have your partner squat down (exercising good form) and lift your legs like you would a wheelbarrow. As your partner lifts you up, tighten you glutes and abs to prevent your self from drooping. When you’re stable, bend your elbows and lower your chest until you upper arms are parallel to the ground. Hold for a second and then push back up.

Tree limb pull-up

This move works the biceps, shoulders and back.

Pull-ups are hard to execute perfectly. But that’s the advantage of having a partner.

To do this, grasp a tree branch (or a monkey bar), keeping your hands shoulder-width apart, palms facing inward.

Bend your knees and cross your ankles so you’re hanging. Your buddy should support you by grasping your shins just below your knees.

Pull your chest towards the branch or bar by bending your elbows and squeezing your shoulder blades down and back. Tilt your head back slightly to avoid hitting the branch. Have your body help you lift as much as you need to perform the move.

Source: MSN Health