Fat-Burning Cardio You Should Be Doing

Cycling is a great form of exercise. It relieves stress, and burns fats without completely overwhelming you.

Calorie burner

Cycling effectively burns calories. MSN health notes that even at an easy pace, a 130-poind woman will burn 473 calories in an hour. Amp the ante a bit (using speeds 14-16 mph) burns nearly 591 calories. And is speed up to 20mph or more, you’ll burn as much as 1,000 calories.

Good for the joints

Cycling is a low-impact exercise. Runners and people with knee problems turn to cycling to exercise. Jenni Gaertner, coach of the Riverstone Women’s Racing, an elite team in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho says the good thing about cycling is that "You develop muscle power and cardio endurance without getting beat up."

Skinny legs

"Turning the pedals over 5,400 times an hour gives you serious tone in your quads and calves," Gaertner says. "In other words, the muscles you notice when you’re wearing heels and a mini." To really work your muscles, concentrate on your pedal strokes. Push forward and then down with your quads. Pull back with your hamstrings. Move as if you’re wiping dirt off the bottom of your shoe. Use our calves and hip flexors to pull up and back. If your pedal strokes feel jerky, pedal with one leg at a time to expose your weak spots. Focus on the gaps when you’re back on two feet.

Stress reliever

A British study who observed the mental benefits of indoor versus outdoor exercise found that 71 percent of people who worked out outside said they felt less tense afterward, while 72 percent of indoor exercisers felt more stressed than before.

Savings

Commute Solutions in Austin, Texas reported that a 10-mile roundtrip car commute costs, on average, more than $10 a day, or about $3,300 a year. A University of Washington study on the other hand, reported that 2,374 bike commuters found that a 10-mile route on two wheels set them back just over $300 a year.

Eco-friendly

A Stanford University and University of Michigan study found that if Americans ride their bike for short trips instead of driving their cars, it would reduce CO2 emissions by 11 percent, and oil consumption by 38 percent, or more oil than is available in the entire Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Become a better driver

Cycling engages the body and mind. This whole-body hypervigilance transmits driving. "You don’t notice just pedestrians and cyclists more," Gaertner says. "You become keenly aware of where cars are around you. It’s a sixth sense you tap into no matter how you’re traveling."

Source: MSN