Better Homes and Garden Diet

The Better Homes and Garden Diet is a calorie counting-based diet. Created by the popular magazine Better Homes & Gardens, this diet plan’s approach to weight loss and dieting allows for plenty of opportunities to cook.

Aside form providing plenty of opportunities for you to cook, it also allows you to touch on your math – meaning you would really be doing a lot of counting and computing.

Your daily caloric intake is based on computations which involve your weight, age and gender. This means that everyday, you will be computing calories to stay on track and be as accurate as possible. This also means, you will be doing a lot of weighing in.

Diet and Nutrition

For this diet plan, you will be using several charts, graphs and a calculator (a lot!) for you to accurately determine your calorie intake. You will also be basing your figures on the old USDA Food Guide (not the updated 2005 version) to determine portions, calories and of course, what you’ll be eating everyday from each of the food groups: meat, dairy, vegetables, fruits, grains, fats and sweets.

Though none of the food groups will be eliminated completely, you will likely modify the amount of your consumption from the six food groups.

Exercise

The Better Homes and Garden Diet plan has an extensive list of guidance for exercising and staying active. There’s something for pros and beginners alike. Some of the exercises include: yoga, Pilates, running, walking, as well as other tips to help you stay fit.

Pros and Cons

Pros

The Better Homes and Gardens Diet offers over a hundred recipes created by Better Homes & Gardens magazine. It includes daily menus, four daily programs you can choose from, exercise guides and even shopping lists. Plus, it does not cut out any food group, yet it’s vegetarian friendly. Finally, this diet offers free membership.

Cons

On the downside, this diet plan is a little laborious-what with all the calorie counting and the daily weigh ins. Also, it relies on the old USDA Food Pyramid.