Real Age Diet

Also known as a "non-diet diet," Real Age diet is a weight loss program created by Dr. Michael Roizen which promises to make you biologically younger than your choronological age.

He claims that eating the right foods is the secret, and that losing weight while preserving the looks of your youth will lead you to a healthy lifestyle. The idea of real age lies on one’s biological age, not on the typical chronological age that we know.

According to Roizen, eating the right foods reduces the risk of having chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and heart diseases. His eating philosophy: "Eat nutrient rich, calorie poor and delicious."

Focusing on a single food or food group isn’t advisable according to Roizen, as it may not contribute to weight loss and delay of aging. He also stressed out the importance of a stress-free and enjoyable eating environment.

Foods to avoid: red meat, saturated fats, trans-fats, simple sugars, and empty calories or foods with high GI or glycemic index, which can cause weight gain.

The RealAge diet doesn’t give a system in creating your own version of the diet, although there are recipes and menus which provide a basis for changing your diet. A sample day’s menu for a person who’s into RealAge diet include the following:

  • Breakfast: Blueberries, soy milk, and orange juice
  • Lunch: Soy nut butter and whole-fruit spread on whole-wheat bread, a plum, and soy milk
  • Dinner: a salad with avocado, canned tuna, and nuts with olive oil dressing, whole-grain crackers, and a glass of red wine
  • Dessert: strawberries dipped in a little dark chocolate
  • Snack: whole-wheat pretzel with mustard

This diet is highly recommended to those who are willing to make some serious changes to improve their health, but not those whose main motivation is weight loss.

One popular criticism by experts to Roizen’s program is that it’s doubtful how he managed to calculate the exact extra years you can expect to live by changing your diet.

Roizen says that every recommendation made in the book is backed up by scientific evidence. Critics rise up saying that there’s no research that backs up the calculations of how many years will be added or subtracted from your life depending on how you eat.